Bollard People of Geelong, Australia.

Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to meet their bollard people in person. Geoff and our son made their acquaintance while they were in Geelong last weekend. They’re so creative, and would be most suitable guests for a Mad Hatter’s tea party if only you would wave a magic wand and bring them all to life. Indeed, that would be rather interesting, and I can’t help wondering what would happen to unsuspecting Geelong if that were to come about. Would they be forces of good or evil? I don’t know. There are over 100 bollards, which were all designed by artist Jan Mitchell who was commissioned by the City of Greater Geelong in 1995 to transform reclaimed timber pier pylons into these remarkable works of art.

26 Steam Captain
Captain of the steamship S.S. Edina, in operation from 1888 to 1938.
23. Scallop Fishermen and Woman (3)
From the early 1800’s, fish and crustaceans from Geelong were marketed and sold locally, as well as in Melbourne.
Above: 20. Established in 1854, the Geelong Volunteer Fire Brigade is represented by this figure reflecting the burning of the “Lightning” in 1869.
25. Sailor and Woman (2)
A 2nd World War couple representing the Sailors’ Rest institution building, corner Moorabool Street and Eastern Beach Road (now a restaurant).
18.Mrs de Carteret
This is a portrait of the proprietor of “La Cabine”, located on the corner of Yarra and Brougham Streets and once famous for its lemon squash.
19. Yacht Club Lady
Geelong’s Yacht Club was formed in 1859. The lady is holding the trophy won by “The Paddy” after racing in the first Geelong Regatta.
Not sure who this lot is.
17. Early Geelong Footballer
A nearby field, which became Transvaal Square, was used for football practice.

Well, now I feel like jumping on a plane and trying to find and identify all 48 bollards. They have this wonderful fusion of history, humour and really help to give Geelong a sense of place and character. Indeed, I’d love to see something like this in our local area. What can we do to give us character, individuality and artistic flair? Traditionally here in Australia, that has involved building something big such as Coffs Harbour’s Big Banana, the Big Prawn in Ballina, the Big Pineapple on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast, the Big Orange in Mildura, the Big Merino and the Big Cow at Nambour also on the Sunshine Coast. I don’t know whether it’s an achievement or a point of shame that I’ve been to all of these throughout my lifetime. Geoff resisted revisiting the Big Merina driving home from Geelong through the week.

Have you ever seen the Bollard People of Geelong? Or, perhaps you have something similar in your local area you’d like to share? I’d love to check it out.

Best wishes,

Rowena

3 thoughts on “Bollard People of Geelong, Australia.

  1. Rowena Post author

    Yes, although Geoff has been there, I’m quite keen to check out Geelong, Queensland and Point Lonsdale. My Great Grandfather was First Mate with the Adelaide Steamship Company serving onboard coal ships. One night they sailed right through a ferry which was sideways in the rip a number of people drowned and there was a big court case. I didn’t want to tell Jonathon too much about that before he arrived home safely.
    Here’s a brief overview of the accident: Australasian (Melbourne, Vic. : 1864 – 1946), Saturday 10 May 1924, page 38

    HOW WYRALLAH WAS LOST.

    The Court of Marine Inquiry, consisting of Mr Cohen,PM, . with Captain Pidgeon and Captain Ramsay* marine assessors, which inquired into the circumstances attending the collision between the s.s. Dilkera and- the s.s. Wyrallah at the Rip found that the primary cause of the. collision was the action of the Master of the Wyrallah in leading his course on his own starboard side of the channel and star boarding his helm to eteer across the channel and across the course of the in coming Dilkera. It also found that if, after the course of the Wyrallah had been altered to port, the master of the Dilkera had reversed his engines to full speed astern, the collision might not have occurred. It recommended that a fully equipped motor-lifeboat should be provided at Queenscliff.
    Best wishes,
    Rowena

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