Tag Archives: Donald Trump

The Lost Wall of Mexico – Friday Fictioneers.

Nobody asked any questions at first. Although the unexplained structure was longer than the Great Wall of China, even the dog walkers ignored it. Newspapers speculated that his concrete monstrosity, was going to be a new mall. However, overnight, all became clear when the army moved in, and the border between Colorado and New Mexico closed.

At first, Trump said it was fake news. However, he finally had to admit there was a mistake. The map had been upside down. There was now a $US5.7 billion wall between Colorado and New Mexico. The new wall became known as “Mexico’s Revenge”.

……

100 words.

This has been another contribution to Friday Fictioneers hosted by Rochelle Wishoff-Fields, where we write up to 100 words to a provided photo prompt. PHOTO PROMPT © Jean L. Hays

This take was inspired by my own dreadful sense of direction and spatial awareness. You can’t be good at everything. Men can get quite self-righteous about their map-reading skills, knocking women who might happen to turn the map “upside down” to get where we’re wanting to go. So, this was a comic play on this.

Best wishes,

Rowena

 

 

 

American Diner Down Under.

The Ipswich fish & chips shop was being bulldozed, making way for an American diner. As the bulldozers fired up, Pauline raged: “I’ll show Ronald Glump!”

“You won’t get away with this. Queensland’s not the 51st state of America. Ipswich says No. Not over my dead body.”

“Mr Glump, sir we’re under attack from a red-headed missile,” Robert Campbell IV, Vice-President Asia-Pacific shrieked down the phone. Australians wrestled crocodiles, wielded knives like swords and he’d failed boy scouts.

“Where’s the riot squad? Call my mate, Mr Turnbull. He’ll build a wall. That’ll keep ‘em out.”

“But what about the customers?”

_________________________________________________________________

This is a contribution for Friday Fictioneers. This week’s PHOTO PROMPT © Roger Bultot.

The Pauline alluded to in this story is highly controversial Australian Senator, Pauline Hanson founder and I think leader of the One Nation Party. Before going into politics, she owned a fish & chips shop in Ipswich, Queensland. She’s famous for a lot of things including her flaming red hair, her infamous saying: “Please explain!” which has become part of the Australian lexicon. You can read her bio here. And here’s a link to her alter-ego Pauline Pantsdown. I’ll leave you to draw your own conclusions about this colourful character and what would ever happen if she and President Elect Trump came to blows. WWIII? Nup! That would be child’s play!

xx Rowena

Weekend Coffee Share November 12, 2016.

Welcome to Another Weekend Coffee Share!

If we were having coffee today, there are no guesses about what we’d be talking about. Although I live on the other side of the planet, I’ve been following the US election. I was following along because I’m interested in current affairs but I’m also intrigued by people and what makes them tick. We really can be quite unpredictable. While I wasn’t entirely sold on Hillary Clinton, I’m no fan of Donald Trump. I am old enough to remember the horror of the Berlin Wall and what that meant and it makes me sick to think of a wall dividing the US and Mexico. Haven’t we moved beyond all of that? I hope so.

Anyway, I was doing some research today and I stumbled across a quote from Rumi, which I immediately related to the election. If you’d like to find out how Rumi ties in with the election, read on.

Moving on, I’d be telling you that my husband celebrates his 50th Birthday next weekend. We’re keeping things fairly low key as it’s a really busy time of year and we’ll do something later. However, we’ll be going out for dinner with my parents, his sister and niece and having a beach picnic as well. I’ve wrapped most of his presents and am now putting together a slide show of photos.

Putting together the slide show has put me through a whole gamut of emotions. Of course, it’s been wonderful to go through our wedding photos, photos of the kids as babies and rapidly growing up on my computer screen. Yet, at the same time, there’s this melancholy sense of loss. Wondering where all the time’s gone and there was an underlying anger about the severe auto-immune disease which was brought by my second pregnancy. The knowing of what those people were going through and how all that impacted on the smiling little man in the photographs before his world was turned upside down and all but blown up. It’s hard to re-live that, even though I love the photos.

I guess many of us have that mixture of happiness and sadness reflecting in the mirrors of the past.

While going through the photos, I found photos from our “before the second baby” trip to Tasmania in November 2005 and I decided to start sharing these on the blog. So far, I have posted about our trip to Coles Bay, which includes breathtaking Wine Glass Bay. It was a stunning spot but for me, the highlight of the photos was seeing our then 18 months old son without having to chase after him. He always has been Mr Personality. Here’s Coles Bay, Tasmania with our Little Man. He finally fell asleep at Sleepy Bay of all places.

Thursday night, I had my lyrical dance class. This is my second last lesson for the year and I’m going to miss it so much! Each week, we’ve been looking at various styles and influences on modern dance. We’ve looked at Martha Graham, Isadore Duncan and last week we looked at Doris Humphrey and her fall and recovery technique. I have to admit this felt pretty weird to me. I’ve had some nasty falls in my time and so it really went against the grain to push my body towards a fall if if I was going to save myself. I might not have pulled off these moves with a dancer’s finesse but I didn’t end up on the floor either.

I’ve been wondering where these dance lessons are taking me. What am I doing there?

When I first signed up, I just wanted to get out of my seat and have a go. After having a few dreams where I was dancing, I didn’t want to be a spectator anymore. I knew dance had somehow entered my psyche even if it didn’t make any sense.

Of course, so many things don’t make sense, especially at the beginning. You’re standing there clutching one piece of a 1000 piece puzzle and wondering why you can’t make out the picture but you just need to hang in there. Have faith. Trust that you’re heading where you’re meant to be. That’s a huge leap of faith for those of us without a crystal ball.

On the other hand, what have I got to lose?

I could be watching TV.

Wherever dancing is taking me, it’s definitely brought my daughter and I closer. I tried to show her the steps I’d learned on Thursday night and she said it wasn’t like anything she’d done before. That rang a few alarm bells. She seems to think I should be lifting my leg forward and up where I’m thinking it went behind and it really did look more like I was trying to climb over a barbed wire fence, which wasn’t very encouraging. By the way, while we were working out these moves we had had leg lift over the violin case and leg lift over the dog. Our kitchen was a veritable obstacle course.

Perhaps, I’m learning dance to go into stand-up comedy!

Meanwhile, I did manage to infuse a bit of dance imagery into a poem about trying to photograph some jacaranda flowers,  which were dancing in the wind: Jacaranda Dreaming

“Poetry is just the evidence of life. If your life is burning well, poetry is just the ash.”

Leonard Cohen

Lastly, I would just like to make a tribute to legendary poet and song writer Leonard Cohen who passed away last week. I have barely touched the surface of his work but I love Alleluia. Had to share this quote:

“I think the term poet is a very exalted term and should be applied to a man at the end of his work. When he looks back over the body of his work and he’s written poetry then let the verdict be that he’s a poet.”

Leonard Cohen

How was your week? I hope it’s been a good and wish you a fabulous week ahead.

This has been part of the Weekend Coffee Share hosted by Diana over at  Part Time Monster

Best wishes,

Rowena

Rumi & Me…the US Election.

Like millions around the world, I was shocked to hear that Donald Trump has been elected President of the United States.
By now, there’s not much left to say, which hasn’t already been said. That is, other than to share my son’s insight on the fiasco: “Mum, did you realise that Donald Trump was elected President on 9/11?!!” Not a good omen, but we already knew that.
While doing some research today, I came across this quote from Rumi:

“If in the darkness of ignorance, you don’t recognize a person’s true nature, look to see whom he has chosen for his leader.”

-Rumi.

That Donald Trump wasn’t a lone voice calling out in the American wilderness, is only one of the scarier aspects of Trump’s victory. That he has millions of followers and like-minded people who may not agree with all of his policies, but agreed enough to get out there and vote. Vote in a country where the hard won right to vote, is optional and millions bail out. Where voting requires a lot more political and philosophical motivation than it does here in Australia (we get fined if we don’t vote.)

So, these people really chose to vote for Donald Trump. Or, they chose not to vote for Hillary Clinton.
2016-election
In addition to those who voted for Donald trump, there were those who didn’t vote in this critical election, even though the future of the so-called “free world” may depend on it. These people potentially trouble me more than those for voting for Trump.
Moreover, while I’m being critical of the US elections, let’s address the question of whether America is truly democratic. After all, is it democratic when you have to be a zillionaire to have any chance of being elected President? If the system is rotten to the core, how can you expect to elect good fruit?
This rot isn’t confined to America, of course.
Britain has its Brexit.
Australians have elected controversial Pauline Hanson to the Senate.
If our elected leaders, as Rumi suggests, do reflect who we are as a people, what do these choices say about us?About them?
It is a concern.
Yet, of course, it doesn’t say an awful lot about those who didn’t vote for him.
Indeed, many of these folk fought long and hard to block Trump’s quest for the White House.
So, what can they do now when they’re forced to live under his Presidency? How do they and those of us around the world,  stand up and fight for social justice when our faith seemingly flies against the wind?
Unfortunately, I am a woman of words, not of action. However, I know that I am not alone and neither are you. A  few grains of sand can gain momentum, building up into a mighty storm. However, we have to find the courage and strength to act.We need to get up out of the couch and plant ourselves somewhere we can make a difference. I don’t know where that is for me. As a writer, I hope that these words become seeds and get people thinking about what they are planting…seeds of love or seeds of hate. After all, those seeds will grow tall and strong fueled by sun, rain and soil and then they will bear fruit. We need to be very careful about the kind of fruit we’re mass producing as this is definitely not a game.
seed
If we plant two seeds of love, for every seed of hate, anger and fear… then collectively we can overcome these negative vibes which are spreading throughout democratic nations which value freedom, truth and justice. We can defend the values our countries have always held dear, even under the terrorist threat.
After all, we don’t want to change our stripes and become what we hate…especially when we as nations have fought long and hard to defend democracy, freedom of speech, equality. Values which could see someone as small as an insignificant mustard seed rise up and become the President of the United States, the Prime Minister of Britain or Australia based on merit instead of money.
Evidently, the US election, as well as elections in Britain and Australia, have given me much to think about in terms of our political systems. Obviously, I’m idealistic but I’m not about to throw out my rosy-coloured glasses yet. How about you? What are your thoughts? Let’s keep this constructive. I’m wanting to encourage the good stuff at a time when it’s seemingly under threat.
xx Rowena
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