Tag Archives: kangaroos

J- Jindabyne, NSW…A-Z Challenge.

Welcome to Day 10 of the Blogging from A to Z April Challenge 2020. Today we’re heading South from my grandparents’ place in Ipswich, Queensland to Jindabyne, which is the gateway to the Australia’s Snowy Mountains and ski fields, which have somehow become known as “The Australian Alps”. Please let me assure you, that these are not “Alps” in the real sense of the word, and are more like rounded hills than these soaring mountain peaks you see in other countries. However, you can still built snow people, have a snowball fight, ski and snowboard if you must.

While Ipswich was about the people, Jindabyne was about the experience, and for us that was skiing. We’ve made this trip a few times staying at Jindabyne and using that as a base to go skiing at Perisher.

Map of Jindabyne

Map showing the location of Jindabyne in relation to Mount Kosiuszko.

Jindabyne has come along in leaps and bounds, and has become so much more than cheaper place to crash for the night after squeezing out every precious moment on the snow. There’s a bevy of fantastic restaurants. So, you can eat well after an energetic day out on the slopes. In particular, we discovered Con and Donna’s fantastic Mexican restaurant,  Cocina Mexican Grill & Cantina, located in the town centre.

As much as I love great food, as I writer, I also love a story and I had a fantastic chat with Donna who drew me into their web. I might get some of these details wrong, but that’s the beauty of conversations as they pass through the years and become stories. Forty years before they opened in 2012, Con’s parents arrived in Jindabyne from Greece and like so many migrants during the 1960s, his father ended up working on the Snowy Hydro Scheme. Also, like many within the Greek community, he opened a milk bar, and restaurants working very long hours and carving out a future for their family in their adopted land. Over the years, the restaurant has had many transformations. However, when Donna and Con stripped it all back to start over, they found the original milk bar counter buried underneath and revived it. You’ve got to love a bit of nostalgia. They’ve also added a lot of personal touches like the pressed tin ceiling and suspended lights.

I clearly remember taking a number of photos inside the restaurant, as I was quite fascinated by the decor. Goodness knows where they went, and I’m convinced my dastardly computer has gobbled them up. It’s been doing a lot of that lately. I’ve been trying to dig up photos for this series, and so many of my photos have gone missing. It’s been incredibly frustrating. I have this one particular photo I want to use, and I can see it as clear as daylight in my head, but where it’s run off to is anyone’s guess. Indeed, I’ll have to start running missing photos ads, except you need a photo to run the ad. You can’t just leave an empty space. So, as you can see, I’m stuck between a rock and a hard place. So, I simply present my apologies and this hope you like this photo of a Jindabyne local chewing on a carrot stick.

kangaroo with carrot

We were feeding kangaroos carrots for breakfast.

Thought you might also enjoy this photo… Crows At Sunrise. Just be thankful you can’t hear the din!!

DSC_6589

However, while these nature shots are wonderful, this is why we were there:

However, before I head off, I just wanted to let you know that Jindabyne and the Snowy Mountains aren’t just a Winter destination. Indeed, I’ve also been down there a few times in Summer with my parents when we went on the Lakes Walk from Charlotte’s Pass through to Blue Lake, a staggering distance of  19 kms. Aside from constantly pleading with my parents: “Are we there yet?”, I remember seeing some very pretty alpine flowers. More importantly, I also saw snow for the very first time. Indeed, we tobogganed down some snow on very stylish garbage bags  near the top of Mt Kosciusko . It was so much fun.

Rowena Mt Koziosko

Here I am at the summit of Australia’s tallest peak, Mt Kosciusko, which is  2,228 metres (7,310 ft) above sea level. 

Well, I hope you’ve enjoyed our trip to Jindabyne and thank you for your patience. It’s hardly what I consider a professional tour, but until my photos miraculously reappear, it’s needing to be a case of “she’ll be right mate”.

Have you ever been to Jindabyne? Or, perhaps you’ve been somewhere else starting with J? I’ve never been to Japan. There had been talk of our daughter traveling to Japan with the Central Dance Company this year, but it’s been a good thing those plans lost momentum before the coronavirus came to pass.

We hope you and yours are keeping safe.

Best wishes,

Rowena

 

 

K- Forester Kangaroo – Macropus giganteus

Welcome to Day 11 of the A-Z Challenge.

For those of you overseas, no doubt you’ll find meeting today’s guest rather exciting because you may be meeting a kangaroo for the first time. Although I’m Australian born and bred, I still love seeing kangaroos, particularly in the wild as you usually don’t see them very often and contrary to some tourists’ hopes, you won’t find them hopping through the city streets.

During our 3 week trip to Tasmania in January, we were mostly staying with friends out in the bush near Devonport. This meant we were immersed in the local wildlife. There were numerous Bennett’s Wallabies, Kangaroos, birds and my son swears he heard a Tasmanian Devil howling in the night. That was all very special, although our daughter wasn’t so keen on the news of the Devil. You see, we often arrived home from our travels rather late at night and even though they eat dead bodies rather than the living, she didn’t want any up close and personal encounters.

Unfortunately, given that there is so much wildlife in Tasmania, especially of the small hopping variety, too many animals find their way on the roads and end up as what we Australians call “Road Kill”. On average, 32 animals are killed every hour on Tasmanian roads.

‘More animals die per kilometre on Tasmanian Roads than anywhere else in the world,’ says Don Knowler, author of Riding the Devil’s Highway.

‘The scale of road kill in Tasmania is just colossal,’ he says, adding that almost 300,000 animals are killed a year, with some groups putting the figure as high as half a million.

Another problem is secondary road kill. Animals like the very, endangered Tasmanian Devil, are run over while feeding on the road.

When we were driving back from Port Arthur at night, you could see the Bennett’s Wallabies in high numbers beside the road and it wasn’t uncommon to see them hopping across the road not far in front of the car and needing to take preventative measures. Unfortunately, we hit a wallaby and when we turned back we found its dead joey beside it. Naturally, I felt sick and and horrified shock that we’d done that to any kind of animal, especially a mother with her joey. There are wildlife groups, like WIRES, which take in injured animals and try to nurse hem back to the wild. Unfortunately, our wallaby and joey had died on impact.

I should also note that as important as it is to avoid hitting animals on the roads, it is also important to consider your own safety. While I was at university, a friend of mine died swerving to avoid a koala on the road and hit a tree.

These are some of the realities behind all those images you see of cute, fluffy Australian marsupials and thankfully there are people trying to increase awareness of the dangers of road kill and caring for injured animals to reduce the toll.

Yet, more must be done.

xx Rowena

Reference

http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/tasmania-roadkill-capital-of-the-world/7021816http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/offtrack/tasmania-roadkill-capital-of-the-world/7021816