Tag Archives: Who

Q- Question…A-Z Challenge.

“The important thing is not to stop questioning.

Curiosity has its own reason for existing.”

-Albert Einstein

Welcome back to my series of Motivational Quotes for the A-Z April Challenge where I’m choosing a word for each letter of the alphabet and then finding corresponding quotes.

This process has become an adventure in itself, because I didn’t plan ahead and now I’m not only putting these together on the run, I’ve fallen behind. However, there is still honour in bringing up the rear. After, I’m in the process of catching NOT giving up.

“Sometimes the questions are complicated and the

answers are simple.”

Dr Suess

Personally, I believe that questioning is more important than knowledge and once we think we know everything there is to know about a subject, that we’ve condemned ourselves to ignorance. There is always what we don’t know we don’t know and that’s probably what we need to watch out for most.

When my kids were being taught to write at school, they were taught to ask the following questions (otherwise known as WWWWH):

Who?

What?

Where?

Why?

How?

Even though we might be well down the path from those early writers, as we’re getting caught up in the flow, creativity and showing off, I’ve still found it helpful to come back to these basics…Have I covered the WWWWH? After all, while we might know our story or subject, our readers aren’t mind readers and it can be all too easy to think we’ve communicated what our readers need to know, when in fact we haven’t. It’s still stuck in our head.

I am currently working on biographical short stories which fit somewhere on the spectrum between fiction and non-fiction. I not only need to cover the WWWH of each of these characters, but where they were in time and place and there’s no room for mistakes. It has to be right. No assumes or slacking off. So, asking questions is very important and I’m so grateful for Google and all the resources which are right at my fingertips without leaving home. Getting the answers is nowhere near as painful as it used to be back in the day. Indeed, we researchers are incredibly blessed.

Best wishes,

Rowena